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By William Shakespeare

   (from Love's Labours Lost)

When daisies pied and violets blue

   And lady-smocks all silver-white

And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue

   Do paint the meadows with delight,

The cuckoo then, on every tree,

Mocks married men; for thus sings he,

                         Cuckoo;

Cuckoo, cuckoo: Oh word of fear,

Unpleasing to a married ear!


When shepherds pipe on oaten straws,

   And merry larks are plowmen’s clocks,

When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws,

   And maidens bleach their summer smocks,

The cuckoo then, on every tree,

Mocks married men; for thus sings he,

                         Cuckoo;

Cuckoo, cuckoo: Oh word of fear,

Unpleasing to a married ear!


  • Nature

Poet Bio

William Shakespeare
Actor, dramatist, and poet, William Shakespeare is the most highly regarded writer in the English language. Born in Stratford-Upon-Avon in England, Shakespeare wrote 38 plays, including Othello, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, and Romeo and Juliet. His epic narrative poems and 154 sonnets include some of the world’s most quoted lines. See More By This Poet

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