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By Stanley Kunitz

An agitation of the air,


A perturbation of the light


Admonished me the unloved year


Would turn on its hinge that night.


 


I stood in the disenchanted field


Amid the stubble and the stones,


Amazed, while a small worm lisped to me


The song of my marrow-bones.


 


Blue poured into summer blue,


A hawk broke from his cloudless tower,


The roof of the silo blazed, and I knew


That part of my life was over.


 


Already the iron door of the north


Clangs open: birds, leaves, snows


Order their populations forth,


And a cruel wind blows.


Stanley Kunitz, "End of Summer" from The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz. Copyright © 1953 by Stanley Kunitz.  Reprinted by permission of W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Source: The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz (W. W. Norton and Company, Inc., 2002)

Poet Bio

Stanley Kunitz was born in Worcester, Massachusetts and received a BA and MA from Harvard. His first book of poetry, Intellectual Things, was published in 1930, but it was not until the 1950s, when he received the Pulitzer Prize, that he gained widespread recognition. His poetry gradually evolved, from the very formal, heavily metered, esoteric poetry of his early years, to the conversational, free verse, “transparent” poems of his later years.

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