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By Alison Hawthorne Deming

Pomegranates fell from the trees

in our sleep. If we stayed

in the sun too long

there were aloes

to cool the burn.

Henbane for predators

and succulents when the rain was scarce.

 

There was no glorified past

to point the way

true and natural

for the sexes to meet.

He kept looking to the heavens

as if the answer were anywhere

but here. I was so bored

with our goodness

I couldn’t suck the juice

from one more pear.

 

It’s here, I kept telling him,

here, rooted in the soil

like every other tree

you know. And I wove us

a bed of its uppermost branches.


Alison Deming, “Eve Revisited” from Science and Other Poems. Copyright © 1994 by Alison Deming. Reprinted by permission of Louisiana State University Press.

Source: Science and Other Poems (Louisiana State University Press, 1994)

Poet Bio

Poet and writer Alison Hawthorne Deming was born in Hartford, Connecticut. She earned an MFA from Vermont College and worked on public and women’s health issues for many years. A descendant of the American novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne, Deming is native to New England, but has studied and taught in many other regions as an instructor and guest lecturer. She is a professor of creative writing at the University of Arizona and lives in Tucson.

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