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By Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white;

Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;

Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font.

The firefly wakens; waken thou with me.


   Now droops the milk-white peacock like a ghost,

And like a ghost she glimmers on to me.


   Now lies the Earth all Danaë to the stars,

And all thy heart lies open unto me.


   Now slides the silent meteor on, and leaves

A shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.


   Now folds the lily all her sweetness up,

And slips into the bosom of the lake.

So fold thyself, my dearest, thou, and slip

Into my bosom and be lost in me.


n/a

Source: The Longman Anthology of Poetry (2006)

  • Love
  • Nature
  • Relationships

Poet Bio

Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Alfred, Lord Tennyson was born one of 12 children to a wealthy family in Lincolnshire, England. With poems such as In Memoriam, an elegy for a friend, and Idylls of the King, a long narrative, Tennyson became the most popular English poet of his time. Queen Victoria made him Poet Laureate in 1850. He is buried in Westminster Abbey.

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